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Max Schmidheiny Lecture

 
 
The Max Schmidheiny Lecture at the St. Gallen Symposium has become an important part of the Max Schmidheiny Foundation’s engagement for an international debate on long-term issues of economic policy, and in particular on ordnungspolitik. In particular, the lecture is meant as a prominent platform for dialogue between academia and business on the future of free societies in a time when their classical premises are increasingly called into question and their achievements are all too easily taken for granted.

Regularly, leading figures of global public life are invited to make a very special contribution to the keynote programme of the St. Gallen Symposium at the University of St. Gallen/Switzerland and to relate the symposium’s annual topic – reflecting current debates in management and global affairs – to pressing issues of the time from a liberal viewpoint. Thereby, the Max Schmidheiny Lecture is furthering a long tradition of distinguished global leaders and public intellectuals addressing the St. Gallen Symposium on fundamental issues of freedom and responsibility, a tradition closely tied to the history of the Max Schmidheiny Freedom Prize which was presented annually at the St. Gallen Symposium from 1979 to 2003.

On the occasion of the St. Gallen Symposium’s 40th anniversary, Prof. Niall Ferguson held the first Max Schmidheiny Lecture on “Entrepreneurial Freedom in the New Global Financial System” in May 2010. In 2011, in a lecture entitled “Open Society and Its Enemies”, Ayaan Hirsi Ali put the liberation movements of the “Arab spring” into perspective. At the 42nd St. Gallen Symposium, Prof. Dr. Peter Sloterdijk closed the keynote programme on 4 May 2012 with the Max Schmidheiny Lecture on the relationship between immunity, risk awareness and a culture of failure.
 
 
» More information on the Max Schmidheiny Lecture 2012 by Prof. Dr. Peter Sloterdijk
 
 
» More information on the Max Schmidheiny Lecture 2011 by Ayaan Hirsi Ali
 
 
» More information on the Max Schmidheiny Lecture 2010 by Prof. Niall Ferguson